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The season is a-changing in most of the U.S. right now (well, perhaps not in parts of the Southwest or Florida, where the only preparation they do is to prepare to receive winter tourists escaping the cold). For many, it’s a time of green (or brown) grass adorned with crimson, gold and tangerine-colored leaves, cooling temperatures, and the promise of holidays is ahead. It’s also time to get ready for whatever kind of winter you usually experience.

Those piles of leaves are not just there for kids to play in, although they are a big attraction even for adults. Did you know that if you left the leaves there, they decompose and make it harder for your grass to grow in the spring? So, grab a rake.

No matter where you live, along with leaves the gutters of your home receive junk, whether from trees, flying debris, or the powder left behind by roof tiles (split shingle, concrete or composite), clogging them so rainwater can’t flow through. Then they spill over. This overflow can damage your home’s siding, foundation, and leave huge ruts in your landscaping. Get a ladder out and take a survey of them before they have a chance to build up.

While you’re at it, check your roof shingles, which may have begun to warp, age or shed and if repairs are in order, do them before the rains hit. The summer sun can be brutal on them.

Even in the Southwest and along the west coast, stucco and concrete can crack and expand. Take a stroll around the exterior of your home, looking for damage along the pathways and cracks in stucco that could lead to water intrusion, especially around windows. Those cracks and gaps around windows and doors can rob you of heat in the winter and cool air in the summer. They also can harbor critters who have made your home their own.

Patios need attention in the fall. Those cushions we lay around on in outdoor living areas can mold and discolor in the rain and should be stored away. Even in hot areas where rain is more infrequent, however, wicker and teak outdoor furniture can receive some brutal treatment. Might be a good time to check around for damage and take stock of what needs to be replaced.

Many fireplaces still burn wood. If yours does, schedule a time to have your chimney and heating system cleaned and maintained, including swapping old filters for new ones. It’s important that everything is in good working condition to decrease the likelihood of house fires. Speaking of fires, your dryer vent can get a lint build-up and now is a good time to clean it. Cooler weather means more static electricity, meaning lint can ignite more easily.

Source: ZillowPorchlight, TBWS